Supermarkets Top Alternative Formats (Part 1)

1 2016alternativeformats

Now more than ever, alternative formats like mass merchandisers, natural food retailers, dollar stores and even drugstores are encroaching on supermarket food sales. The following companies from the 2016 Top 75 list of U.S. and Canadian retailers represent the alternative formats with the most food sales.

1Walmart

1. Wal-Mart Stores

Annual sales: $247.5 billion (estimated, consumables only)

2costco

2. Costco Wholesale Corp.

Annual sales: $69.4 billion (consumables only)

3CVS.jpg

3. CVS Health

Annual sales: $44.4 billion (estimated, consumables only)

4Target.jpg

4. Target Corp.

Annual sales: $34.2 billion (estimated, consumables only)

5Walgreens.jpg

5. Walgreen Co.

Annual sales: $28.3 billion (estimated, consumables only)

6Meijer_0.jpg

6. Meijer, Inc.

Annual sales: $16.9 billion (estimated)

7WholeFoods.jpg

7. Whole Foods Market

Annual sales: $15.4 billion

8DollarGeneral.jpg

8. Dollar General Corp.

Annual sales: $15.3 billion (estimated, consumables only)

9_7Eleven.jpg

9. 7-Eleven

Annual sales: $13.3 billion (estimated, consumables only)

10TraderJoes.jpg

10. Trader Joe’s Co.

Annual sales: $13 billion (estimated)

5 food retailers among 50 ‘Most Admired’ companies.

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Food retailers Costco, Whole Foods, Target, Walmart and Publix are all ranked among a list of top 50 “Most Admired” U.S. companies, according to a ranking published this week by Fortune.

The annual list rates companies in attributes of their reputation including innovation, people management, use of corporate assets, social responsibility, quality of management, financial soundness, long-term investment value, quality of products and services and global competitiveness. Apple was the No. 1 ranked company, followed by Alphabet (Google) and Amazon.

Among food retailers, Costco ranked No. 12, Whole Foods 24, Target 39, Walmart 42 and Publix 49.

  1. 1.
    Apple aapl, -1.24 %
    • Cupertino, Calif.
    • Computers
  2. 2.
    Alphabet googl, -1.46 %
    • Mountain View, Calif.
    • Internet Services and Retailing
  3. 3.
    Amazon.com amzn, -2.96 %
    • Seattle, Wash.
    • Internet Services and Retailing
  4. 4.
    Berkshire Hathaway brka, -0.78 %
    • Omaha, Neb.
    • Insurance: Property and Casualty
  5. 5.
    Walt Disney dis, -1.67 %
    • Burbank, Calif.
    • Entertainment
  6. 6.
    Starbucks sbux, -2.87 %
    • Seattle, Wash.
    • Food Services
  7. 7.
    Southwest Airlines luv, -1.75 %
    • Dallas, Texas
    • Airlines
  8. 8.
    FedEx fdx, -1.36 %
    • Memphis, Tenn.
    • Delivery
  9. 9.
    Nike nke, -1.43 %
    • Beaverton, Ore.
    • Apparel
  10. 10.
    General Electric ge, -2.19 %
    • Fairfield, Conn.
    • Electronics
  11. 11.
    American Express axp, -2.61 %
    • New York, N.Y.
    • Consumer Credit Card and Related Services
  12. 12.
    Costco cost, 0.18 %
    • Issaquah, Wash.
    • Specialty Retailers
  13. 13.
    Nordstrom jwn, -2.12 %
    • Seattle, Wash.
    • General Merchandisers
  14. 14.
    Facebook fb, -1.45 %
    • Menlo Park, Calif.
    • Internet Services and Retailing
  15. 15.
    Coca-Cola ko, -0.60 %
    • Atlanta, Ga.
    • Beverages
  16. 15.
    Johnson & Johnson jnj, -0.86 %
    • New Brunswick, N.J.
    • Pharmaceuticals
  17. 17.
    Microsoft msft, -1.54 %
    • Redmond, Wash.
    • Computer Software
  18. 18.
    BMW bamxy, -5.17 %
    • Munich, Germany
    • Motor Vehicles
  19. 19.
    Netflix nflx, -2.35 %
    • Los Gatos, Calif.
    • Entertainment
  20. 20.
    JP Morgan Chase jpm, -3.01 %
    • New York, N.Y.
    • Megabanks
  21. 21.
    Procter & Gamble pg, -1.10 %
    • Cincinnati, Ohio
    • Soaps and Cosmetics
  22. 22.
    Boeing ba, -2.69 %
    • Chicago, Ill.
    • Aerospace and Defense
  23. 23.
    Goldman Sachs Group gs, -2.80 %
    • New York, N.Y.
    • Megabanks
  24. 24.
    Whole Foods Market wfm, -1.88 %
    • Austin, Texas
    • Food and Drug Stores
  25. 25.
    Wells Fargo wfc, -2.94 %
    • San Francisco, Calif.
    • Megabanks
  26. 26.
    BlackRock blk, -3.21 %
    • New York, N.Y.
    • Securities and Asset Management
  27. 27.
    CVS Health cvs, -1.12 %
    • Woonsocket, R.I.
    • Food and Drug Stores
  28. 28.
    Toyota Motor tm, -2.35 %
    • Toyota, Japan
    • Motor Vehicles
  29. 29.
    Marriott International mar, -1.39 %
    • Bethesda, Md.
    • Hotels, Casinos, Resorts
  30. 30.
    Delta Air Lines dal, -2.27 %
    • Atlanta, Ga.
    • Airlines
  31. 31.
    Home Depot hd, -0.76 %
    • Atlanta, Ga.
    • Specialty Retailers
  32. 32.
    IBM ibm, -1.74 %
    • Armonk, N.Y.
    • Information Technology Services
  33. 33.
    UPS ups, -1.39 %
    • Atlanta, Ga.
    • Delivery
  34. 34.
    salesforce.com crm, -3.13 %
    • San Francisco, Calif.
    • Computer Software
  35. 35.
    Samsung Electronics
    • Suwon, South Korea
    • Electronics
  36. 36.
    Accenture acn, -1.67 %
    • Dublin, Ireland
    • Information Technology Services
  37. 37.
    Exxon Mobil xom, -1.42 %
    • Irving, Texas
    • Petroleum Refining
  38. 38.
    Nestle nsrgy, -0.89 %
    • Vevey, Switzerland
    • Consumer Food Products
  39. 39.
    Target tgt, 1.66 %
    • Minneapolis, Minn.
    • General Merchandisers
  40. 40.
    St. Jude Medical stj, -1.61 %
    • St. Paul, Minn.
    • Medical Products and Equipment
  41. 41.
    Unilever ul, -1.44 %
    • London, United Kingdom
    • Consumer Food Products
  42. 42.
    Walmart wmt, -0.69 %
    • Bentonville, Ark.
    • General Merchandisers
  43. 43.
    Intel intc, -1.15 %
    • Santa Clara, Calif.
    • Semiconductors
  44. 44.
    PepsiCo pep, -0.87 %
    • Purchase, N.Y.
    • Consumer Food Products
  45. 45.
    Caterpillar cat, -3.74 %
    • Peoria, Ill.
    • Construction and Farm Machinery
  46. 46.
    Deere de, -0.16 %
    • Moline, Ill.
    • Construction and Farm Machinery
  47. 47.
    Visa v, -2.05 %
    • Foster City, Calif.
    • Consumer Credit Card and Related Services
  48. 48.
    AT&T t, -0.14 %
    • Dallas, Texas
    • Telecommunications
  49. 49.
    Publix Super Markets
    • Lakeland, Fla.
    • Food and Drug Stores
  50. 50.
    Charles Schwab

Independents rule: 2016 Top 50 list.

rouses1

SN’s annual list of the Top 50 Small Chains and Independents has several new faces this year, after four of last year’s companies moved up to SN’s Top 75 Retailers and Wholesalers in the U.S. and Canada.

At the apex of this year’s independent roster is Vallarta Supermarkets, a Sylmar, Calif.-based operator catering to a primarily Hispanic consumer base in the Greater Los Angeles area. The addition of three new stores during the year — for a total of 47 locations — helped push it to No. 1 from No. 8 a year ago.

Nipping at Vallarta’s heels is Rouses Enterprises, which caters to consumers along the Gulf Coast. Despite operating three fewer stores — for a total of 43 locations — Rouses moved to No. 2 on the list from No. 7 last year.

In third place is PAQ, Stockton, Calif., which operates 19 stores in Northern California (one more than a year ago) and 24 in Hawaii. PAQ was No. 6 a year ago.

Jerry’s Enterprises, Edina, Minn. — which operates under a variety of banners — made a big leap this year, landing at No. 4 from No. 13 last year, due in large part to opening five additional stores.

At No. 5 is Marsh Supermarkets, Indianapolis, falling from No. 3 a year ago with the closings of six locations.

No. 6 on the list is H Mart, an Asian American operator based in Lyndhurst, N.J., which moved to this year’s Top 50 list after appearing on SN’s Top 75 list in 2015; followed at No. 7 by Redner’s Warehouse Markets, Reading, Pa., a chain of warehouse stores and convenience stores that moved up from No. 10 a year ago.

Completing the top 10 companies on the list are Festival Foods, Onalaska, Wis., at No. 8 — compared with No. 11 last year — with one additional store; Fairway Market, New York, at No. 9 — up from No. 12 — with three additional stores; and Niemann Foods, Quincy, Ill., which added three convenience stores to its diversified base and moved to No. 10 from No. 15 in 2015.

Disappearing from the list is Haggen, which stood at No. 38 a year ago — just before beginning a major expansion into Southern California, Arizona and Nevada that failed and prompted its owners to initiate efforts to sell the entire chain.

Making their Top 50 debuts on this year’s list at Nos. 47 through 50 are Market Basket Foods, Nederland, Texas; Town & Country Grocers, Fredericktown, Mo.; Mars Super Markets, Glen Burnie, Md.; and Red Apple Group, New York.

As the list demonstrates, independent operators are finding more opportunities to grow their store base and their businesses as the industry’s larger companies continue to consolidate.

2016 Top 50 Small Chains and Independents USA

vallarta1

Sales numbers are listed as estimates, although SN (SUPERMARKET NEWS) did attempt to obtain accurate figures by contacting every company on the list.
    1. Vallarta Supermarkets 2016
    2. Rouses Enterprises 2016
    3. PAQ 2016
    4. Jerry’s Enterprises 2016
    5. Marsh Supermarkets 2016
    6. H Mart 2016
    7. Redner’s Warehouse Markets 2016
    8. Festival Foods 2016
    9. Fairway Market 2016
    10. Niemann Foods 2016
    11. King Kullen Grocery Co. 2016
    12. Foodland Super Market 2016
    13. Glass Gardens 2016
    14. Harps Food Stores 2016
    15. Dierbergs Markets 2016
    16. Homeland Stores 2016
    17. Lewis Food Town 2016
    18. Lund Food Holdings 2016
    19. Cardenas Markets 2016
    20. Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage 2016
    21. Cosentino’s Food Stores 2016
    22. Heinen’s 2016
    23. Roche Bros. Supermarkets 2016
    24. Kings Food Markets 2016
    25. Pyramid Foods 2016
    26. Reasor’s 2016
    27. All American Quality Foods 2016
    28. Brown’s Super Stores 2016
    29. Ball’s Food Stores 2016
    30. Martin’s Super Markets 2016
    31. Sedano’s 2016
    32. Earth Fare 2016
    33. Harmons 2016
    34. Gelson’s Markets 2016
    35. Perlmart 2016
    36. Fred W. Albrecht Grocery Co. 2016
    37. Good Food Holdings 2016
    38. Mi Pueblo Food Centers 2016
    39. RoNetco 2016
    40. B&R Stores 2016
    41. Miner’s 2016
    42. Tawa Supermarket 2016
    43. E&H Family Group 2016
    44. Nugget Markets 2016
    45. Stew Leonard’s 2016
    46. C&K Market 2016
    47. Market Basket Foods 2016
    48. Town & Country Grocers 2016
    49. PCC Natural Markets 2016
    50. Mars Super Markets 2016

The Disruptors: Food industry game changers.

 

At just 21, Wes Schroll is reinventing grocery shopping for Millennials; Blue Apron’s founders are cultivating a new generation of home chefs; and Whole Foods’ global grocery coordinator is attracting young consumers through product transparency.

They are among SN’s carefully curated list of 25 food industry Disruptors, who, for better or for worse, are bucking the status quo and shaking up the way food retailers do business.

In addition to responding to new consumer trends and in some cases pioneering them, SN’s Disruptors, which were selected by SN’s editors in consultation with industry experts, represent those who are innovating online, influencing store formats and competition, and shaking up the business world.

Check out our list of Disruptors below, and the linked profiles of these industry notables, authored by SN’s editors and our IdeaXchange partners.

INNOVATING ONLINE

• Apoorva Mehta, CEO and founder, Instacart, has developed and expanded Instacart to make it possible for supermarket operators of all sizes to offer home delivery.

• Matt Wadiak, Matt Salzberg and Illia Papas, co-founders of Blue Apron, are changing eating habits while cultivating a new generation of home chefs.

• Kieran Shanahan, who as VP of operations, Walmart.com, is at the forefront of Walmart’s multimillion-dollar e-commerce expansion, connecting stores to online grocery shoppers

• As VP of AmazonFresh Tom Weiland may set consumer expectations for online grocery before some traditional retailers even get in the game.


TARGETING NEW CONSUMER PREFERENCES

• Co-founders of the weekly Smorgasburg food festival, Eric Demby and Jonathan Butler tapped into the possibilities for food’s future by bringing together creative food makers and enthusiastic eaters.

Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, a designated B Corp company, seeks to serve as a model for other companies.

• Chipotle’s chief creative and development officer, Mark Crumpacker, is molding the chain’s “Food with Integrity” messaging that is shaking up the food industry as a whole.

• Eataly founder Oscar Farinetti is making his mark with high-volume destination stores dedicated to quality products and immersive guest experiences that don’t follow the rules of any one format.

Paul Lightfoot, CEO of BrightFarms, makes sure there’s an established market for BrigthFarms’ greenhouse-grown produce before constructing a new project, allowing the company to scale faster than competitors.

• PRE Brands founder and CEO Lenny Lebovich is responsible for creative disruption in the meat section, which signals a new vision for the production and distribution of beef.

Suzy Monford, CEO of Andronico’s and a certified holistic health coach, is transforming the industry’s health and wellness approach by adding fitness to the equation.

Wes Schroll, the 21-year-old CEO of Fetch Rewards, is reinventing grocery shopping for Millennials with a mobile app that allows shoppers to scan items as they shop, and receive manufacturer discounts and additional savings.

• Whole Foods Market’s executive global grocery coordinator, Errol Schweizer, is pioneering trends such as GMO transparency and driving consumer and supplier buy-in.


INFLUENCING STORE FORMATS AND COMPETITION

Brian Cornell, CEO and chairman of Target Corp., is initiating changes in Target’s food assortment to appeal to Millennial tastes, with an emphasis on natural, healthy and good-for-you items.

Jodie Daubert, merchandising head of Ahold Fresh Formats, is crafting the assortment of a first-of-its-kind store.

• Aldi CEO Jason Hart is rolling out small-format, limited-assortment Aldi at a fast pace, and evolving the banner as quickly as he’s blanketing new markets.

• Sprouts Farmers Market CEO and former CFO Amin Maredia is investing in technology and human resources to keep the momentum of Sprouts Farmers Market, going.

Gil Phipps, VP of corporate brands for Kroger, is taking the “corporate” out of Kroger’s brands by giving them a strong dose of personality.

Brendan Proctor, CEO of Lidl US, is causing retailers to put their defensive plans in action, two years before any stores are due to open.


SHAKING UP THE BUSINESS WORLD

Alex Behring, Jorge Paulo Lemann, Carlos Alberto Sicupira, Marcel Telles and Roberto Thompson, founders of 3G Capital, are applying aggressive cost-cutting measures to the U.S. food and beverage companies they acquire.

• Cerberus Capital Management founder Stephen Feinberg’s “backing of Albertsons is the best example of distribution done right in the industry,” says Neil Stern, senior partner at McMillanDoolittle.

Food Safety Modernization Act brings far-reaching changes to the way every step of the supply chain defends and monitors food.

Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University, pursues a fearless critique of the food industry.

The state of Vermont has mandated GMO labeling.

Margo Wootan, nutrition policy director for Center for Science in Public Interest, led the effort to require calorie labeling on menus.

Report; 2016 Top 75, consolidation transforms food retailing.

 

While supermarkets continue to consolidate, sales of food and consumables at alternate formats continue to take a bigger slice of the competitive pie, according to SN’s annual list of the Top 75 retailers and wholesalers in North America.

Four of the top 10 companies are not traditional supermarket operators — two are discounters Walmart and Target and two are drugstores, whose sales of food and household items surpass the volumes of dozens of conventional operators.

Drugstores and dollar stores are “stealth competitors” that have been taking volume from supermarkets for years, Neil Stern, senior partner at McMillanDoolittle, Chicago, said, “and while it’s a big amount when you look at it in total, most supermarkets see it on an individual-store basis and have been slow to react.  But that’s going to have to change.

“Those formats are taking business based on convenience, and supermarkets are going to have to find ways to offer goods more conveniently — possibly by doing what they do in the U.K., where they set aside areas of 1,000 square feet or so at the front of the stores and sell milk and eggs and other basics.”

According to Chuck Cerankosky, an analyst with Northcoast Research, Cleveland, sales at alternative formats are likely to continue to grow, even as the economy improves. “While operators like Kroger and Costco are seeing people trading up, it’s not unusual to think those retailers and others might lose a handful of items to an alternate format. Even with the economy improving, not every purchase will be bundled together with a trip to the supermarket.”

CVS Health, Woonsocket, R.I., landed at No. 5 on the list, with estimated consumable sales of more than $44 billion at approximately 7,911 drugstores, while Walgreen Co., Deerfield, Ill., was No. 10, with 8,173 stores accounting for estimates exceeding $28 billion in consumables.  With Walgreens in the process of acquiring Camp Hill, Pa.-based Rite Aid Corp., it could push that figure close to $36.5 billion.

Dollar stores also continue to be effective competitors, with Dollar General, Goodlettsville, Tenn., at No. 19 (compared with No. 17 last year) with $15 billion in consumable sales, and Dollar Tree, Chesapeake, Va., at just under $11 billion (moving up to No. 24 from No. 36 last year following its acquisition of Family Dollar).

Online operations

Online competition from Amazon.com, Seattle, is also on the rise, with sales of consumables moving the company up to No. 53 on this year’s list from No. 62 a year ago.

Stern said he believes Amazon will remain “a behemoth” that supermarkets will have to continue to deal with. “Because Amazon is so well capitalized, it can continue to spend and grow while losing money,” he noted.

Though supermarkets will continue to expand their online businesses, that growth is likely to parallel Amazon’s growth rather than replace it, Stern said.  “It’s unlikely anyone will be able to slow down Amazon, other than possibly Amazon itself,” he noted.

AmazonFresh delivers in Brooklyn.

AmazonFresh delivers in Brooklyn, N.Y.

According to Cerankosky, what conventional retailers need to do “is get people into their stores for food and let them buy other stuff online. Even as retailers become increasingly involved in the digital universe to deliver food as part of an omnichannel approach, there’s nothing like buying fresh food at the store. That’s the epitome of quality food retailing.”Supriya Chaudhury, CMO for Clavis Insight, Boston — which helps businesses understand online opportunities — said Amazon is likely to continue to gain additional customers by driving innovations in delivery systems.

“Supermarkets have not yet developed as many innovations to capture consumers’ interest in convenience, and Amazon will probably hold the lead it has for some time,” she said.

“Walmart is making a huge investment in building an online operation with enough categories to have an impact and capture consumers who are active with Amazon, but most pure supermarket operators are less developed in the space,” Chaudhury noted.  “Instacart certainly helps bridge the gap on delivery logistics, but there is still a lot the large supermarkets need to do to get to the level of some of the other players.”

Jim Hertel, senior partner at Willard Bishop, Chicago, said he believes brick-and-mortar retailers have an advantage over Amazon for at least three to five years “because of two huge advantages: They are closer to customers — with a supermarket within two-and-a-half miles of 80% of the population — and they have built long-term relationships with consumers.

“What Amazon is investing in is ways to get closer to customers, and if it can leverage that, then it will be an even bigger factor for supermarkets in five to 10 years.

“The key area is fresh.  Amazon can deliver packaged foods, but it hasn’t solved the problem of delivering on its fresh promise, and that’s the window supermarkets have to take advantage of.”

Andrew Wolf, managing director for BB&T Capital Markets, Boston, offered a similar opinion.  “The world of grocery shopping is increasingly built around perishables, and that’s not a category a business can make money on delivering to people’s doors in the suburbs. A click-and-collect system works much better for perishables, and I don’t think the threat of Amazon will grow — not in the perishables area — because there’s no compelling business model to get fresh food to people and still make money.”

Consolidation matters

Even as alternate formats chip away at supermarket volumes, the industry continues to change with ongoing consolidation.

While some things remain pretty much the same — with Walmart, Kroger Co. and Costco Wholesale Corp. continuing to top the Top 75 list, as they have for over a decade — consolidation has removed four significant chains from the list, opening the way for four newcomers to join.

Gone are Safeway, which was acquired by Albertsons early in 2015; Family Dollar, which was acquired by Dollar Tree at mid-year; A&P, which liquidated its assets late in the year; and Roundy’s, which agreed to be acquired by Kroger Co. in a transaction scheduled to be completed early in 2016.

In their place are four geographically diverse companies, who appear in the last four spots on this year’s list: Fareway Stores, Boone, Iowa; Inserra Supermarkets, Mahway, N.J.; Lowe’s Market, Littlefield, Texas, and Northgate Gonzalez Market, Anaheim Calif., with volumes ranging from $1 billion to $1.3 billion.

While the Roundy’s deal will simply cement Kroger’s position as the leading conventional player on the list and the A&P volume was dispersed among many buyers, the Safeway merger moved Albertsons up the list to No. 4 from No. 9 a year ago, while the Family Dollar acquisition pushed Dollar Tree to No. 24 from No. 36.

Finishing out the top 10, CVS and Target were Nos. 5 and 6, with Canada-based Loblaw Cos. No. 7; Publix Super Markets, Lakeland, Fla., No. 8; C&S Wholesale Grocers, Keene, N.H., No. 9; and Walgreens, No. 10.

Observers told SN overall industry consolidation is likely to be a constant factor going forward.

“Some consolidation will be strategic, like the Delhaize-Ahold merger, which came about when those companies realized they needed to grow sales on the East Coast after the Kroger-Harris Teeter merger,” Cerankosky said.

“We’re also likely to see more smaller, in-market consolidations that enable mid-level operators to gain scale. Companies like Kroger and Costco use scale to deliver value to customers, and more companies will realize that’s something they can’t do by remaining small.”

Stern said he expects a slowdown in larger deals — like Albertsons-Safeway and Ahold-Delhaize — “because those just don’t happen that often.  But we’re likely to see more smaller deals of the Kroger-Roundy’s size.”


Hertel said he anticipates more consolidation “because companies want to grow. But if their top lines aren’t growing, many believe they can achieve more bottom-line growth by consolidating to achieve greater economies of scale,” he explained.

He also said he anticipates more deals involving midsized companies.  “There is a drive for grocery chains to operate 2,000 stores and up, and it’s easier to get there through acquisition than building new stores,” he said.

Wolf said consolidation will be driven by the desire of retailers to offer value, which can encompass quality as well as pricing. “Value is what exacerbates the gap between good and bad operators,” he explained.

ADDENDUM:

IGA accounts for worldwide sales of approximately $37 billion from 5,451 stores. Of the total, 1,121 stores in the U.S. account for $7.8 million (21% of the total) and 4,330 stores in 32 other countries and territories, including Canada, account for $29.2 billion (79%

2016 Top 75 U.S. & Canadian Food Retailers & Wholesalers.

 2016-01-04_15-18-33
    1. Wal-Mart Stores Company News
    2. Kroger Company News
    3. Costco Wholesale Corp. 2016
    4. Albertsons 2016
    5. CVS Health 2016
    6. Target Corp. 2016
    7. Loblaw Cos. 2016
    8. Walgreen Co. 2016
    9. Publix Company News
    10. C&S Wholesale Grocers 2016
    11. Ahold USA Company News
    12. H-E-B 2016
    13. Supervalu Company News
    14. Delhaize America Company News
    15. Meijer Inc. 2016
    16. Sobeys 2016
    17. Wakefern Food Corp. 2016
    18. Whole Foods Market 2016
    19. Dollar General Corp. 2016
    20. 7-Eleven 2016
    21. Trader Joe’s Co. 2016
    22. Aldi USA 2016
    23. Southeastern Grocers 2016
    24. Dollar Tree 2016
    25. Giant Eagle 2016
    26. BJ’s Wholesale Club 2016
    27. Hy-Vee Food Stores 2016
    28. Metro Inc. 2016
    29. Associated Wholesale Grocers 2016
    30. Rite Aid 2016
    31. SpartanNash 2016
    32. United Natural Foods Inc. 2016
    33. Wegmans Food Markets 2016
    34. WinCo Foods 2016
    35. Demoulas Super Markets 2016
    36. Save Mart Supermarkets 2016
    37. Stater Bros. Markets 2016
    38. Unified Grocers 2016
    39. Overwaitea Food Group 2016
    40. Smart & Final 2016
    41. Ingles Markets 2016
    42. Price Chopper Supermarkets 2016
    43. Sprouts Farmers Market 2016
    44. Houchens Industries 2016
    45. Raley’s Supermarkets 2016
    46. Weis Markets 2016
    47. Tops Markets 2016
    48. Schnuck Markets 2016
    49. Key Food Stores Co-operative 2016
    50. Alex Lee Inc. 2016
    51. K-VA-T Food Stores 2016
    52. Bozzuto’s 2016
    53. Amazon.com 2016
    54. Associated Food Stores 2016
    55. Brookshire Grocery Co. 2016
    56. Central Grocers 2016
    57. The Fresh Market 2016
    58. Saker ShopRites 2016
    59. Grocery Outlet 2016
    60. Superior Grocers 2016
    61. Woodman’s Markets 2016
    62. Affiliated Foods Midwest 2016
    63. Big Y Foods 2016
    64. 99 Cents Only 2016
    65. Village Super Market 2016
    66. Affiliated Foods 2016
    67. Bashas’ 2016
    68. Bodega Latina 2016
    69. Coborn’s 2016
    70. Piggly Wiggly Midwest 2016
    71. Brookshire Brothers 2016
    72. Fareway Stores 2016
    73. Inserra Supermarkets 2016
    74. Lowe’s Market 2016
    75. Northgate Gonzalez Market 2016

Top 25 Global Food Retailers 2015.

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    1. Wal-Mart Stores 2015 — Global edition
    2. Costco 2015 — Global edition
    3. Carrefour 2015
    4. Kroger Co. 2015 — Global edition
    5. Tesco 2015
    6. Seven & I 2015
    7. Schwarz Group 2015 (Lidl)
    8. Walgreens Boots Alliance 2015
    9. AEON 2015
    10. Aldi 2015 — Global edition
    11. Target Corp. 2015 — Global edition
    12. Auchan 2015
    13. Metro Group 2015
    14. CVS 2015
    15. Casino Group 2015
    16. Woolworths 2015
    17. Rewe Group 2015
    18. Edeka 2015
    19. Albertsons 2015 — Global edition
    20. Leclerc 2015
    21. Coles Group 2015
    22. Ahold 2015 — Global edition
    23. ITM (Intermarché) 2015
    24. Sainsbury’s 2015
    25. Loblaw 2015 — Global edition

2015 Top 50 Small Chains and Independents.

2016-01-02_18-07-36

    1. Fareway Stores 2015
    2. Inserra Supermarkets 2015
    3. Marsh Supermarkets 2015
    4. Northgate Gonzalez Market 2015
    5. Lowe’s Market 2015
    6. PAQ 2015
    7. Rouses Enterprises 2015
    8. Vallarta Supermarkets 2015
    9. Cardenas Markets 2015
    10. Redner’s Warehouse Markets 2015
    11. Festival Foods 2015
    12. Fairway Market 2015
    13. Jerry’s Enterprises 2015
    14. King Kullen Grocery Co. 2015
    15. Niemann Foods 2015
    16. Homeland Stores 2015
    17. Harps Food Stores 2015
    18. Foodland Super Market 2015
    19. Dierbergs Markets 2015
    20. Lund Food Holdings 2015
    21. Lewis Food Town 2015
    22. Cosentino’s Food Stores 2015
    23. Glass Gardens 2015
    24. Roche Bros. Supermarkets 2015
    25. Kings Food Markets 2015
    26. Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage 2015
    27. Heinen’s 2015
    28. Martin’s Super Markets 2015
    29. Gelson’s Markets 2015
    30. All American Quality Foods 2015
    31. Ball’s Food Stores 2015
    32. Reasor’s 2015
    33. Sedano’s 2015
    34. Harmons 2015
    35. Brown’s Super Stores 2015
    36. Pyramid Foods 2015
    37. Perlmart 2015
    38. Fred W. Albrecht Grocery Co. 2015
    39. Haggen Inc. 2015
    40. Good Food Holdings 2015
    41. Miner’s 2015
    42. RoNetco 2015
    43. Stew Leonard’s 2015
    44. Earth Fare 2015
    45. B&R Stores 2015
    46. Tawa Supermarket 2015
    47. E&H Food Group 2015
    48. Mi Pueblo Food Centers 2015
    49. Town & Country Grocers 2015
    50. C&K Market 2015

2015 USA & CANADIAN FOOD RETAILERS TOP 75

201401Lessons-retailers-need-to-learn-from-the-Target-breach-to-protect-against-similar-attacks

    1. Wal-Mart Stores Company News
    2. Kroger Company News
    3. Costco Wholesale Corp. 2015
    4. Loblaw Cos. 2015
    5. Safeway Company News
    6. Publix Company News
    7. Ahold USA Company News
    8. C&S Wholesale Grocers 2015
    9. Albertsons 2015
    10. H-E-B 2015
    11. CVS Health 2015
    12. Sobeys 2015
    13. Delhaize America Company News
    14. Supervalu Company News
    15. Meijer Inc. 2015
    16. Target Corp. 2015
    17. Wakefern Food Corp. 2015
    18. Dollar General Corp. 2015
    19. Whole Foods Market 2015
    20. 7-Eleven 2015
    21. Trader Joe’s Co. 2015
    22. Southeastern Grocers 2015
    23. Walgreens Boots Alliance 2015
    24. Metro Inc. 2015
    25. Aldi USA 2015
    26. Giant Eagle 2015
    27. BJ’s Wholesale Club 2015
    28. Hy-Vee Food Stores 2015
    29. Associated Wholesale Grocers 2015
    30. SpartanNash 2015
    31. Family Dollar Stores 2015
    32. Wegmans Food Markets 2015
    33. United Natural Foods Inc. 2015
    34. WinCo Foods 2015
    35. A&P 2015
    36. Dollar Tree 2015
    37. Save Mart Supermarkets 2015
    38. Overwaitea Food Group 2015
    39. Stater Bros. Markets 2015
    40. Roundy’s Supermarkets 2015
    41. Unified Grocers 2015
    42. Ingles Markets 2015
    43. Demoulas Super Markets 2015
    44. Rite Aid 2015
    45. Price Chopper Supermarkets 2015
    46. Smart & Final 2015
    47. Raley’s 2015
    48. Sprouts Farmers Market 2015
    49. Tops Markets 2015
    50. Weis Markets 2015
    51. Schnuck Markets 2015
    52. Houchens Industries 2015
    53. K-VA-T Food Stores 2015
    54. Alex Lee Inc. 2015
    55. Associated Food Stores 2015
    56. Bozzuto’s 2015
    57. Brookshire Grocery Co. 2015
    58. Central Grocers 2015
    59. The Fresh Market 2015
    60. Saker ShopRites 2015
    61. Affiliated Foods Midwest 2015
    62. Amazon.com 2015
    63. Big Y Foods 2015
    64. Key Food Stores Co-operative 2015
    65. Superior Grocers 2015
    66. Woodman’s Markets 2015
    67. Affiliated Foods 2015
    68. Bashas’ 2015
    69. Grocery Outlet 2015
    70. H Mart 2015
    71. Village Super Market 2015
    72. Coborn’s 2015
    73. Piggly Wiggly Midwest 2015
    74. Bodega Latina 2015
    75. Brookshire Brothers 2015

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